Sufiya’s Dream

Sufiya

Sufiya Khutan, of Tala Upazila, Bangladesh, became a child bride when she was only 13. By 14, she had already become a mother. When her husband, the only earning member of the family, fell ill several years ago, Sufiya had to rise above dire financial hardship to provide for her daughter Selina’s education and give her a better and more secure future. Their dream? That Selina will become a doctor.

Villagers in Sufiya’s community have criticized her for spending money on her daughter’s education, and the family receives marriage proposals for Selina almost daily. Unable to support more than one child’s education, parents in Bangladesh often decide to educate their sons instead of their daughters, convinced that a son will be able to better provide for his family.

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Influencers in Bangladesh Highlight Value of Investing in Girls’ Education

 Education is indispensable. If you invest one dollar in female education, you can get five dollars in return.”

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Moderator Mahmud Hasan – Country Coordinator for WGLG Bangladesh – engages panelists Mashuda Khatun Shefali of Nari Uddog Kendra; Dr. Iftekhar Uzzaman of Transparency International Bangladesh; and Mr. M K Aaref of the Edward M. Kennedy Center for Public Service and the Arts, Dhaka

USAID Bangladesh, Women and Girls Lead Global (WGLG) and the EMK Center commemorated International Women’s Day with a film screening highlighting the traumatic effects of child marriage – and a discussion that built a powerful case for keeping girls in school instead. Part of an ongoing Gender Seminar incorporating Women of the World films, the event’s theme was, “Girls’ Rights to Education and to Decide When to Marry are Human Rights.” Continue reading

Letters Leading to Evolution

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Thousands of young girls wrote passionate letters declaring their right to stay in school and out of child marriage to commemorate National Girl Child Day in Bangladesh this year.  The Youth Summit and Letter Festival – organized by Women and Girls Lead Global, National Girl Child Advocacy Forum and Youth Ending Hunger-Naogaon – called on girls to write open letters to their parents, telling them why they didn’t want to marry young.  Over 3,000 girls from 53 different schools in Bangladesh participated, sharing their desire for freedom and their disappointment that the law banning child marriage for girls under 16 is not being consistently upheld. Continue reading

Signs of Change at Schools in Bangladesh

facilitating better schools

Schools are gradually becoming more girl-friendly in northwestern Bangladesh, thanks to the interventions of the Best Schools for Girls campaign. Last month, 18 Women and Girls Lead Global film facilitators in Naogaon province gathered for a two-day retreat  to share stories about the changes that schools in their area have implemented since the campaign officially launched in October 2013. Continue reading

Rickshaw Puller Becomes Role Model to Parents across Bangladesh

 

Most poor families in Bangladesh who marry off their daughters before they turn 18 – the legal age of marriage for girls – say that poverty forces them to make the choice. They can’t afford to keep their girls in school or otherwise provide for them, so they withdraw them from school and find a man who can care for them.  The result, for most girls who marry early, is more poverty, as well as higher rates of maternal and infant mortality, and increased susceptibility to violence and disease.

But what happens when a poor family makes a different choice – to keep its girls in school rather than marry them off? Continue reading

Partners in Dhaka Prepared to “Use Film to Inspire Change”

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A length of pink and white striped yarn wrapped around each of our wrists to form a web – connecting trainer to trainee, office staff to field staff, woman to man. Each of us declared our commitment to promoting girls’ education and ending child marriage across Bangladesh and around the world. Some promised to share what they had learned with their colleagues and communities. Some took a more personal oath to educate and nurture their own daughters, or to refuse wedding invitations when the bride was too young. The sense of community grew stronger as we each articulated our promise – our connections stretching not only across the room – but across Bangladesh, across borders, across the globe. Continue reading

Screening Inspires Commitment to End Child Marriage

In July, Country Engagement Coordinator Mahmud Hasan launched Women and Girls Lead Global in the district of Gagni in southern Bangladesh by convening 76 youth activists and a host of local leaders – including journalists, government officials, and police officers – for a screening of Revolutionary Optimists. A rural farming area where many families struggle with poverty, Gagni has a notoriously high child marriage rate. Revolutionary Optimists, which tells the story of a youth group striving to improve their community in the slums of Calcutta, India  – features an adolescent girl who drops out of school and leaves the group to marry her boyfriend. Continue reading

The Lengths Girls Go to Get to School

BANGLADESH_schoolgirls_3For girls in the village of Patnitala in northern Bangladesh, the route to school is fraught with challenges. More than half of the population lives below the poverty line. Most of their families are subsistence farmers without the means to pay for transportation or proper school shoes for their children.  So the girls walk the two miles to get to class barefoot each day, cutting across rice fields, crossing rivers, and splashing through mud puddles. Continue reading