Film Inspires Indian Father to Break the Cycle – #ICommit to Give My Girls the Education They Deserve

A reflection on intergenerational organizing, in honor of AWID’s #ICommit Tweetathon!

revopts_3_Priyanka Mandal leads the Allhadi

A scene from Women of the World film “The Revolutionary Optimists”

When you ask many parents in Indian villages about education, they’ll tell you that it’s an investment – and beyond that, that it’s more valuable to invest in a son’s education than a daughter’s.  That’s what Bhagwat Thorat would have told you before he went to a community screening of the film Revolutionary Optimists. He had pulled each of his three daughters out of school when they reached puberty, fearful that if he waited too long to find them husbands they would have fewer prospects, that they would become victims to sexual violence, or if nothing else, that his investment would end up benefitting the husband’s family and not his own. Continue reading

Letters Leading to Evolution

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Thousands of young girls wrote passionate letters declaring their right to stay in school and out of child marriage to commemorate National Girl Child Day in Bangladesh this year.  The Youth Summit and Letter Festival – organized by Women and Girls Lead Global, National Girl Child Advocacy Forum and Youth Ending Hunger-Naogaon – called on girls to write open letters to their parents, telling them why they didn’t want to marry young.  Over 3,000 girls from 53 different schools in Bangladesh participated, sharing their desire for freedom and their disappointment that the law banning child marriage for girls under 16 is not being consistently upheld.

1908437_556346757831807_942182742305748554_n The letters were displayed on colorful banners at the festival, held in the Patnitala district in northwest Bangladesh. Thousands of people from surrounding communities flocked to the festival to read them, and to select 20 winning letters. The day also included a rally, a film screening and discussion, and cultural performances by the students. The entire day gave girls a rare opportunity to express themselves freely.

Read a few of the inspiring, award-winning letters

“Father, I always wanted to do something special for my family, relatives and of course for my country. To do so, I have to continue my education and earn a good result. I want to work hard to be an independent woman. Baba, you know if I fail to complete my education, I will never be able to fulfill my dream. Please let me complete my education first and then make the decision of marrying me off. I want to prove to myself that I am capable of getting a respectable job and serve my country as a good citizen. I need your blessings.”                         -Aasia Khatun, 10th grade, Patnitala high school

“In our country many girls die prematurely as a result of child marriage. And it is also responsible for family quarrels and fights. Unable to bear this, many girls commit suicide.”  – Nice Parvin, 9th grade Nazipur high school

1908437_556346751165141_7786221573802865235_n“Baba, You arrange my marriage, I am only thirteen! How could you forget about Ritu Apa, who died of giving birth a child at 16! It was you who concurred with other villages that nothing but immature age was the cause of her untimely demise. Please Baba, don’t make the same mistake like Ritu Apa’s parents.” – Sonia Khatun, 8th grade Khirsheen high school

“I will suffer both physically and mentally if you wed me off in this immature age. Please do not make me dependent on someone else. Let me finish my studies so I can be independent.” – Tomy Rani, 10th grade Paddapukur KMH high school

Global Gathering for Girls – Oct 14 at 1pm GMT

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Five countries, six languages, and 100 young people leading change in their communities. Please join Women and Girls Lead Global at our Global Gathering for Girls. We’ll be convening youth from Kenya, India, Bangladesh, Jordan and Peru via Google Hangout to discuss how they’re tackling the greatest challenges facing girls in their countries.

We’ll be joined by Sikha Patra and Salim Shekh, the lead characters from the documentary film Revolutionary Optimists, whose activism has become an inspiration to young people around the world; and by moderator Rebecca Gaynier, founder of iTwixie, an online platform connecting girls’ authentic voices with decision-makers.

Please log on to the Women and Girls Lead Global YouTube Channel to watch the conversation live on October 14 at 1:00pm GMT (see below for time zones around the world).

WGLG will be live-Tweeting about the event and we invite you to join us using #GirlFuture.

Here’s to creating the best #GirlFuture imaginable, together!

 

Global Gathering for Girls Schedule (in GMT)

1:00 – 1:20pm:  Q and A with Sikha Patra and Salim Shekh from Revolutionary Optimists

1:20pm – 2:00pm: Youth participants from Kenya, India, Bangladesh, Jordan and Peru present their challenges and solutions

2:00pm – 2:15pm:  Youth participants exchange solutions

Global Start Times

6:00am Pacific Daylight Time (U.S.)
9:00am Eastern Daylight Time (U.S.)
8:00am Peru
1:00pm Greenwich Mean Time
4:00pm Kenya
4:00pm Jordan
6:30pm India
7:00pm Bangladesh

Add a Twibbon to show your support!

“Proud to support the #GirlFuture” or “Real men support the #GirlFuture”

 

 

Signs of Change at Schools in Bangladesh

facilitating better schools

Schools are gradually becoming more girl-friendly in northwestern Bangladesh, thanks to the interventions of the Best Schools for Girls campaign. Last month, 18 Women and Girls Lead Global film facilitators in Naogaon province gathered for a two-day retreat  to share stories about the changes that schools in their area have implemented since the campaign officially launched in October 2013. Continue reading

Capturing the Essence of WGLG

For the past year, Women and Girls Lead Global has been screening films for communities of farmers, educators, politicians and schoolchildren across the five countries where we work – Bangladesh, India, Kenya, Peru and Jordan.  For many audience members, it’s the first time they’ve seen films about real girls and women triumphing over adversity.  It’s also often the first time they’ve had a chance to discuss issues like child marriage and public safety for girls and women.

Below, we’ve compiled some of our favorite audience responses from our first season of Women of the World films. Their comments suggest the very idea that inspired WGLG: that documentary film has the power to move, inspire and empower people, and to begin the process of catalyzing change.

Rickshaw Puller Becomes Role Model to Parents across Bangladesh

 

Most poor families in Bangladesh who marry off their daughters before they turn 18 – the legal age of marriage for girls – say that poverty forces them to make the choice. They can’t afford to keep their girls in school or otherwise provide for them, so they withdraw them from school and find a man who can care for them.  The result, for most girls who marry early, is more poverty, as well as higher rates of maternal and infant mortality, and increased susceptibility to violence and disease.

But what happens when a poor family makes a different choice – to keep its girls in school rather than marry them off? Continue reading

Powerful New PSA Urges Peruvian Parents to Talk to Teens Now

Teenage girl writes down her anonymous question at a WGLG Peru youth event.

Teenage girl writes down her anonymous question at a WGLG Peru youth event.

“Ahora es Cuando” – Now is the Time – is the name, and also an important message of Women and Girls Lead Global’s (WGLG) campaign in Peru.  Traveling to remote rural communities in the Amazon and Andes regions, the WGLG Peru team found that parents and adolescents in these communities were deeply uncomfortable discussing important reproductive health issues and associated risks. Urging parents to talk to their teens sooner rather than later about these pressing issues, the Ahora es Cuando campaign highlights the important connection between timely access to reproductive health information and the completion of secondary school. Continue reading