Forbidden Voices

Their voices are suppressed, prohibited, and censored. But world-famous bloggers Yoani Sánchez, Zeng Jinyan, and Farnaz Seifi are not frightened of their dictatorial regimes. These fearless women stand for a new, networked generation of modern rebels. In Cuba, China, and Iran their blogs shake the foundations of the state information monopoly – putting their lives at great risk.

Barbara Miller’s film, Forbidden Voices, accompanies these brave young rebels on their dangerous journey and traces their use of social media like Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter to denounce and combat the violations of human rights and freedom of speech in their countries – thereby triggering international resonance by building up enormous political pressure.

TIME Magazine counts them among the world’s most influential voices. Based on their moving eyewitness reports and clandestine footage, Forbidden Voices pays homage to their courageous battle.

Youth Driving Change in Peru

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The face of recognized political actors is changing in Peru.  With scarce resources but strong conviction, youth organizations are fighting for their rights and achieving important social change. Decision-makers are starting to listen. WGLG Peru bets on the power of youth, seeking to build a platform that better connects young leaders to audiences who influence their future. Continue reading

Pray the Devil Back to Hell

Pray the Devil Back to Hell is the astonishing story of the Liberian women who took on the warlords and regime of dictator Charles Taylor in the midst of a brutal civil war, and won a once unimaginable peace for their shattered country in 2003. As the rebel noose tightened around the capital city of Monrovia, thousands of women – ordinary mothers, grandmothers, aunts and daughters, both Christian and Muslim – formed a thin but unshakeable line between the opposing forces. Continue reading

Pushing The Elephant

In the late 1990s, Rose Mapendo was imprisoned with her family during violence that engulfed the Democratic Republic of Congo. Her harrowing experience included the nighttime arrest of her entire family by government agents, the execution of her husband, the birth of their twin sons in prison, and grim negotiations with prison guards to save the lives of her children. She emerged advocating forgiveness and reconciliation. In a country where ethnic violence has created seemingly irreparable rifts among Tutsis, Hutus, and other Congolese, this remarkable woman is a vital voice in her beleaguered nation’s search for peace. Now, Rose is confronted with teaching one of her most recalcitrant students how to forgive  Nangabire, the daughter who remained behind. Continue reading